How to Make Homemade Wine

How to Make Homemade Wine


How to Make Homemade Wine If you're a wine lover, you've probably dreamed of making your own wine right at home. Luckily, with the right tools and ingredients, you can! Once you get the hang of it, you can experiment with different fruits until you find the wine that's perfect for you. Ingredients 16 cups fruit,2 cups honey,1 packet yeast,Filtered water Preparing Supplies and Ingredients Gather supplies. In addition to the wine ingredients, you'll need a few basic supplies to ensure that your wine can age without being affected by bugs or bacteria. Home winemaking shouldn't be expensive, so it's not necessary to splurge on special equipment. You will need the following supplies: A 2 gallon (7.6 L) crock or glass jar (you can often find these at vintage or secondhand stores, however, be advised that many used crocks may have been used for sauerkraut or pickles and could contaminate your wine. A 1 gallon (3.8 L) carboy (a glass container with a small neck),An airlock,A thin plastic tube to be used for siphoning,Clean wine bottles with corks or crew caps,Campden tablets (optional) Pick out your fruit. Wine can be made with any type of fruit, though grapes and berries are the most popular choices. Choose fruit at the peak of its flavor. It's best to choose organic fruit that hasn't been treated with chemicals, since you don't want these to end up in your wine. If possible, use fruit you've picked yourself or buy some from a farmer's market. Some retailers also specialize in providing wine grapes to home winemakers (for example, Wine Grapes Direct), which is great if you do not live near vineyards. Clean the fruit. Take off the stems and leaves, and make sure the fruit doesn't have particles of dirt or grit. Rinse the fruit thoroughly and place it in your crock. You can peel the fruit before crushing, but much of the flavor of the wine will come from its skin. Peeling it will result in a much milder wine. Some winemakers choose not to wash the fruit before crushing. Since fruit has natural yeasts on its skin, it's possible to make wine using only the yeast from the fruit's skin and the air. However, washing the fruit and controlling the yeast you add allows you to ensure that the flavor of the wine will be to your liking; allowing wild yeast to grow can produce foul flavors. If you're up for an experiment, you could make two batches of wine, one with controlled yeast and one with wild, to find out which you like best. Crush the fruit. Using a clean potato masher or your hands, crush and squeeze the fruit to release its juices. Keep doing so until the level of the fruit juice is within 1 1?2 inches (3.8 cm) of the top of the crock. If you don't have enough fruit and juice to fill the crock almost to the top, top it off with filtered water. Add a Campden tablet, which releases sulphur dioxide into the mixture, killing wild yeast and bacteria.[1] If you're making wild yeast wine, don't take steps to kill the yeast.As an alternative to using a tablet, you can pour 2 cups of boiling water over the fruit.Using tap water can affect the taste of your wine, since it contains additives. Be sure to use filtered or spring water.Stir in the honey. Honey provides food for the yeast and sweetens your wine. The amount of honey you use will directly affect the sweetness of your wine. If you prefer sweeter wine, add more honey. If you don't like it as sweet, limit your honey to 2 cups. Take the type of fruit you're using into account as well. Since grapes have a high sugar content, you don't need to add a lot of honey to grape wine. Berries and other fruits with lower sugar content will need a little more honey.You can add sugar or brown sugar instead of honey if you'd like.You can always add more honey later if your wine doesn't come out as sweet as you like.Add the yeast. If you're using your own yeast, now is the time to add it. Pour it into the crock and stir it into the mixture with a long-handled spoon. This mixture is called a must.If you're making wild yeast wine, you can skip this step.
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